How To Make A Good Website

18/08/2011 21:37

A checklist for Web standards

The term web standards can mean different things to different people. For some, the "table-free sites," for others "with a valid code. However, web standards are much broader than that. A website built to the standards must adhere to standards (HTML, XHTML, XML, CSS, XSLT, DOM, MathML, SVG, etc) and implement best practices (valid code, access code, semantically correct code, easy to use, etc. URL).

In other words, a site built to web standards should ideally be lean, clean, CSS-based, accessible, usable and search engine friendly.

About List

This is not an uber-list. There are certainly many things that can be added. More importantly, it should not be considered a list of items to consider at each site that you develop. It is simply a guide that can be used:

* To show the breadth of web standards

* As a convenient tool for site developers during the production phase

* As an aid to developers who are interested in going to web standards

Checklist

First choice of code

1. It is the site using the correct DOCTYPE?

2nd If instead uses a character set?

3. The site uses valid (X) HTML?

4. Is the site valid CSS?

The fifth site does use any CSS hacks?

6. The site is not necessary to use classes or ID?

7. Is the code well structured?

8. The site provides any broken links?

9. How does the site in terms of speed / page size?

10. The site have JavaScript errors?

2. Degree of separation between content and presentation

1. The site use CSS for all presentation aspects (fonts, colors, fills, borders etc)?

2. Are all decorative images in CSS, or appear in (X) HTML?

3. Accessibility for users

1. Are "alt" attributes used for all descriptive images?

A second units of Use relative rather than absolute units for text size?

Are there third aspect of the break available if the font size is increased?

4. Is the site visible menus Go?

5. Does the site use accessible forms?

6. The site use accessible tables?

7. Just color the brightness / contrast?

8. It is the only color to critical information?

9. This is a delayed reaction to the drop-down menu (for users with reduced motor skills)?

10. Are all links descriptive (for blind users)?

4. Accessibility Equipment

1. That site works acceptably in most modern browsers?

2. Content to access CSS switched off or not supported?

The third content accessible with images switched off or not supported?

4. That site works in text browsers like Lynx?

5. The site works well in print?

Is it the sixth site works well for handheld devices?

7. The site includes detailed metadata?

8. That site works well in a wide range of browser window sizes?

5. Basic usability

First there a clear visual hierarchy?

2. Title levels easy to distinguish?

The third site has easy to understand navigation?

A fourth browsing of use consistent?

5. Links are underlined?

The sixth site does use language consistent and appropriate?

7. Do you have a site map and contact page? Are they easy to find?

8th For large sites, there is a search tool?

9. The home page link on every page of your site?

10. The visited links are clearly defined a single color?

6. Site Management

The first site has a 404 page error meaningful and useful works from any depth in the soil?

2. The site uses friendly URLs?

3. URL work without "www"?

4. The site has a favicon?

1. Code quality

1.1 Does the site use a correct doctype?

A DOCTYPE (short for "document type declaration") informs the validator which version of (X) HTML you use, and must appear at the top of each page Doctype is a key component of compliant web pages:. Your markup and CSS will not validate without them.

CODE

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/doctype/

More information:

CODE

http://www.w3.org/QA/2002/04/valid-dtd-list.html

CODE

http://css.maxdesign.com.au/listamatic/about-boxmodel.htm

CODE

http://gutfeldt.ch/matthias/articles/doctypeswitch.html

1.2 The character set of the site?

If a user agent (eg a browser) is unable to detect the character encoding used in a Web document, the user may be presented with unreadable text. This information is particularly important for those maintaining and extending a multilingual site, but declaring the character encoding of the document is important for anyone producing XHTML / HTML or CSS.